Texas Institute for the Preservation of History and Culture

Documenting the complete history of African American Texans

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Know your history, know yourself

African descendants have had a presence in Texas for almost 500 years, maybe longer. The territory was the northernmost area of New Spain (Mexico) in 1528 when Esteban (Estevanico), a Moroccan Moor servant, waded ashore with a group of Spanish conquistadors near what is now Galveston Island and established himself as the first known African in what would become Texas. Since, African Americans have contributed significantly in all facets of the building of the Lone Star State — its infrastructure, image, and culture. For that, the Texas Institute for the Preservation of History and Culture is charting every aspect of the black experience in Texas as an online encyclopedia.

 


New TIPHC Exhibit!

“Biscuits and Business”
The Legacy of Lucille Smith and Southern Black Chefs

Lucille Smith_biscuits posterIn celebration of Women’s History Month, the Texas Institute for the Preservation of History and Culture presents, “Biscuits and Business: The Legacy of Lucille Smith and Southern Black Chefs.” The School of Architecture artist in residence Marlon Hall, and Assistant Professor of Practice, Ann Johnson have collaborated with TIPHC Director Michael Hurd to co-curate an exhibition dedicated to the legacy of chef and entrepreneur Lucille Bishop Smith, who studied and later taught at Prairie View A&M and is noted as the first black businesswoman in Texas.

In 1937, Lucille Smith was invited to design a Domestic Service Training Program for professors and instructors at Prairie View. She went on to develop the first college-level Commercial Foods and Technology Department that was intelligently paired with an apprenticeship program. Smith was the first black woman to join the Fort Worth Chamber of Commerce and for several years her chili biscuits were served on American Airline flights and were also served at the White House. First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt, President Lyndon Johnson and heavyweight boxing champion Joe Louis were among her friends, fans, and customers.

Lucille Smith

                Lucille Smith

The exhibition at Prairie View will feature original artwork by Ann Johnson, and two documentary shorts by Marlon Hall. Assistant Professor of Art, Renee Smith produced the graphic designs. Johnson’s sculpture students have created unique pieces for the exhibit, and School of Architecture Shop Supervisor Shannon Bryant has assembled an extraordinary team of students that have established the architectural foundation of the exhibition.

The opening reception for “Biscuits and Business” is Thursday, March 28, 2019, from 2-4pm in the TIPHC art gallery, in the Nathelyne Kennedy Architecture Building.

The original Lucille Smith exhibition titled, “Reliquary,” was featured on CBS This Morning, and is on exhibit in the private dining room of Lucille’s restaurant at 5512 LaBranch in Houston. Smith’s great-grandson, chef Chris Williams, opened the restaurant in Lucille’s honor.

 

 

 

 

 


Essay: “The Day Freedom Came”

Texas slaves were the last in the country to be officially notified of their freedom because of the Emancipation Proclamation. Since, June 19th, “Juneteenth,” has become a sacred day for African-American communities internationally to celebrate community pride and heritage.

But what about that day itself, in 1865, before the traditional parades, picnics and other events? What was the mood in Galveston — in Texas(!) — for the first citizens to hear those glorious, infamous for some, words of freedom? In this well-crafted piece from genealogist and educator Sharon Batiste Gillins, a Galveston native, we get the answers to those questions and more.

“In the days and weeks that led up to the 19th of June, the newspapers were filled with the latest stories, reports and editorials about the end of the War, the beginning of the peace and the imminent freedom of the enslaved Africans. On June 14th. Galveston Daily News reported that Federal troops would soon arrive in Galveston. The announcement quickly spread throughout the white and black community and the city’s residents were overcome with a curious mix of anticipation and anxiety. Uncertainty permeated the air as they contemplated the consequences of the War’s end and the arrival of Federal troops into the city. Each segment of the population experienced a different set of emotions, the unknown and imagined consequences dissected in print from every angle. That is, every angle except that of the enslaved people whose destiny and very lives would be most impacted.”

Read the entire essay here.

DVD: “Juneteenth, A Celebration of Freedom”

On June 19, 1865 at Galveston, Gen. Gordon Granger of the Union Army announced that the Civil War had ended and all slaves in the former Confederate states were now free. This was two and a half years after President Abraham Lincoln issued his Emancipation Proclamation. However, the enslaved in Texas had never received the news of their freedom.

This DVD, produced by the TIPHC, provides an insightful perspective about this significant day in American history that is often misunderstood and overlooked. This is a compelling program that is popular with school classes and community groups alike.

To order your copy — $15.00 — please contact the TIPHC, 936-261-9836.

For a preview, click here.


Genealogy: Civil Rights history and the family of Judge Willie E.B. Blackmon

The former Houston Municipal Court judge recounts his family’s involvement in two prominent Civil Rights cases, Hall v. DeCuir and Brown v. Board of Education. Read his story here.


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“We have a wonderful history behind us. … If you are unable to demonstrate to the world that you have this record, the world will say to you, ‘You are not worthy to enjoy the blessings of democracy or anything else’.”  

Carter G. Woodson, historian  — “The Father of Black History Month”

Support TIPHC Programming and Research

Donate Now

Your donations support research, exhibits, documentaries, internships, cultural events, lecture series, film screenings, Journal of History and Culture publications, outreach and much more. For more information on how you can donate to TIPHC, please contact Mr. Michael Hurd, Director of TIPHC, at (936) 261-9836 or mdhurd@pvamu.edu.

Texas Black History Calendar
Featured Calendar Post

Jul 16

Wilhelmina Delco

On this date in 1929, Wilhelmina Delco was born in Chicago. Delco received a degree in sociology from Fisk University in Nashville in 1950 and seven years later relocated with her husband to Austin. Delco was elected to the Austin Independent School District Board of Trustees in 1968, making her the first African American elected to public office in Austin. In 1974, she won a seat in the Texas House of Representatives, making her the first African American official elected at-large in Travis County. Delco served 10 terms in the Legislature. In 1991, she was appointed Speaker Pro Tempore, becoming the first woman and the second African American to hold the second highest position in the Texas Houseof Representatives. She retired from the Legislature in 1995.


TIPHC Bookshelf

Books of interest focusing on black history in Texas. Each week, we feature a different title but also maintain a list of suggested readings.

July 14-20, 2019

Let’s Play Two — The Legend of Mr. Cub, the Life of Ernie Banks 

By Ron Rapoport

The definitive and revealing biography of Chicago Cubs legend Ernie Banks, one of America’s most iconic, beloved, and misunderstood baseball players, by acclaimed journalist Ron Rapoport.

Ernie Banks, the first-ballot Hall of Famer and All-Century Team shortstop, played in fourteen All-Star Games, won two MVPs, and twice led the Major Leagues in home runs and runs batted in. He outslugged Willie Mays, Hank Aaron, and Mickey Mantle when they were in their prime, but while they made repeated World Series appearances in the 1950s and 60s, Banks spent his entire career with the woebegone Chicago Cubs, who didn’t win a pennant in his adult lifetime.

The book also tells of Banks’s early life in segregated Dallas, where he attended Booker T. Washington High School (a member of the Prairie View Interscholastic League) and starred in football, basketball, and track (the school did not have a baseball team!).


 

Ron Goodwin Blog

Musings on contemporary black history-related topics from the noted PVAMU history professor.

A community under siege: the Summer of 1919

July 10th, 2019|Comments Off on A community under siege: the Summer of 1919

I wonder Is there anybody here who late at midnight sheds briny tears all because you didn't have no one to help you along the way and oh Lord? And if there's anyone Lord Let me tell you, let me tell you what I've done I've achieved to be a fence around me but take me everyday I told him So what Jesus be a fence all around me When I get burned So Jesus

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