Prior State Service FAQs

  1. Does previous employment with the State of Texas count towards state service?All prior employment with the Texas A&M University System and any other agency or institution of the State of Texas, including employment as a student worker, will be counted except for employment with independent school districts and/or junior or community colleges.
  2. How is total state service determined?  Total state service is determined by counting actual days, months and years of employment with the State.
  3. Please explain by what is meant by “counting actual days, months and years of employment with the State”?  A state employee receives one month of state service credit for each month that the employee is on a state agency’s active payroll, with the following exceptions:
    1. Only actual days employed to determine state service in the case of partial months of employment at the beginning and ending of employment periods with the State are counted. Example: An employee who began employment with the State on January 10, 1996, would receive 22 days of state service credit for the month of January (i.e., 22 is the number of days of employment from January 10, through January 31). For an employee who has multiple periods of employment with the State, the total days of employment in all partial months at the beginning and ending of employment periods are added up, and each 30 days of employment is converted into one month of state service credit.
    2. Except in the case of an employee returning to state employment from military leave without pay, an employee on leave without pay for a full calendar month does not accrue state service credit for the month.
  4. Why is it important that months of state service are correctly calculated?  It’s important because the months of state service impact the longevity pay that eligible employees receive and also affect their rate of vacation accrual.
  5. Who is responsible for providing employing departments evidence of prior state employment so that it may be counted toward state service?  Employees who have had previous employment with the Texas A&M University System, and/or other institutions or agencies of the State of Texas, are responsible for providing to their employing department/unit a written statement from each prior state employer verifying their employment.
  6. How may employees determine what is currently shown as their months of state service?  To determine what is currently shown as their months of state service, employees should log on to HRConnect, which is accessible through Single Sign-On. The employee must click on the Personal Data tab, and it will show the months of state service, indicated next to the Longevity Status in parentheses.
  7. What happens if a review of prior state employment results in an increase to the months of state service?
    1. Longevity Pay – The adjustment to the longevity pay will be made from the beginning of the employee’s current employment (i.e., period in which the employee has experienced no break in service for each applicable month, as long as the employee met the criteria required in System Regulation 31.01.04
    2. Vacation/Annual Leave Accruals – The department will adjust the employee’s vacation leave accruals accordingly from the beginning of the employee’s current employment (i.e., period in which the employee has experienced no break in service) for each applicable month that the employee met the criteria required in System Regulation 31.03.01  For calculating accrual rates after July 1, 2003, System Regulation 31.03.01 should be referred to.
  8. What happens if a review of prior state employment results in a decrease to the months of state service?  Under normal circumstances where the decrease in the months of state service is through no fault of the employee (i.e., the employee did not knowingly provide inaccurate information), the review of prior state employment may result in the employee receiving a lower monthly payment for longevity pay or in a reduction of the vacation accrual rate. The adjustment will be made from point of the correction forward. If it is determined that the employee provided fraudulent information, the employee may be subject to disciplinary action, up to and including termination.
  9. Does the method of salary payment matter when determining creditable prior service?  No. Creditable prior service is to be counted regardless of the method of salary payment (hourly, monthly, etc.), length of appointment, percentage worked, continuity of service or eligibility of longevity and hazardous duty pay in a previous position.
  10. Will employees that are absent from work as a result of a workers’ compensation injury/illness receives state service for the time they are absent?  The answer would depend on whether or not they worked or were in a paid leave status at least part of the month. Employees that are absent as a result of a workers’ compensation injury/illness:
    1. Will receive state service for the month if they work or are in a paid leave status at least a portion of the month.
    2. Will not receive state service for any month they are on leave without pay (i.e., from the first day of a month through the last day of a month, inclusive).
    3. Employees that are off as a result of a workers’ compensation injury/illness do not experience a break in employment; however, if they were on leave without pay for a full calendar month, that month would not be counted in the calculation of total state service for the purpose of longevity pay.
  11. Do employees on approved military leave without pay receive one-month of service credit if they are on military leave without pay for the entire month?  Yes. Employees returning from approved military leave without pay receive one-month service credit for each month they are on military leave without pay, even if it is for the entire calendar month.

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