Infographia Africana Texana

Infographia Africana Texana

It is a comprehensive encyclopaedia of Africans who contributed to the State of Texas in a plethora of ways: Its mission is multi-fold. Specifically, to encourage greater awareness of the achievements and contributions of Texas African Americans and the role they played in the American society and the world, and to provide a better basis for understanding racial and cultural differences. This project is a major component of the newly created Texas Institute for the Preservation of History & Culture (IPHC), a result of the House Bill 889, signed into law by Governor George W. Bush in 1999.

Prairie View A&M University’s resident scholars will collaborate with scholars across the state, the nation and the world to create what will be a tribute to the African Texans as well as milestone in the African American History.

African Americans are some of the oldest residents of Texas. Since 1528, African Texans have had a long heritage in Texas, with contributions second to none to make the state what it is today. However, despite the existence of some literature on a few aspects of this history, the history of African Texans remains largely undocumented, and is in imminent danger of being lost. Examples are: records, artifacts, and memorabilia from segregated Negro school systems, economic development in communities, social organizations, leadership groups before integration, churches, seminole indian scouts, to name just a few. A major goal of the Encarta is to capture this history and disseminate it to the public worldwide.


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