Course Descriptions


Clinical Adolescent Psychology Ph.D. Program

CPSY 7661. Statistics Lab.
(1-0) Credit 1 semester hour. A one-hour course which must be taken in conjunction with CPSY 7963 Advanced Statistical Techniques.

CPSY 7623. Biological Bases of Behavior
(3.0) Credit 3 semester hours. The study of relationships among biological systems (e.g., neurological, cardiovascular, endocrine) and psychological functioning (e.g., sensory and perception, memory, learning, emotion, cognition) in the context of normal and abnormal behavior. Particular attention is focused on child and adolescent normal and abnormal functioning. Review of current theory and research procedures is provided.

CPSY 7703. Cognitive Psychology.
(3-0) Credit 3 semester hours. This course addresses how infants, children and adolescents acquire the ability to know and think, reason, and determine logical outcomes. Cognition is the ability to integrate higher cortical functions in order to orient the self to their innate CNS abilities and how to use this resource to navigate the external world. Involved are basic intellect, emotional stability, appropriate communication and ethnocentric comprehension of one’s environment and social situation. Relevant neurophysiologic aspects of cognition are reviewed as well as the history and philosophy of cognitive psychology. Laboratory assessments of cognitive capacity and/or deficits involving measures of orientation to self, others, date and situation; attention and concentration; calculations; short-term memory; long-term memory; visuospatial and constructional abilities; abstraction and conceptualization will be included.

CPSY 7713. Social Psychology.
(3-0) Credit 3 semester hours. A critical foundation course, social psychology is a bridge discipline involving both group and individual dynamics. Started in the U.S. at the University of Chicago during the early 19th century, social psychology provided the forum for significant interdisciplinary studies during the Great Depression, the World Wars and beyond. Research on basic human interpersonal and intra- and inter-group dynamics are presented (Hawthorne effect, primacy effect, stereotyping, physical attractiveness, attribution bias, social power, compliance, obedience, risky-shift phenomenon) as well as their impact on race relations, gender and sex issues, systems (family, school, community institutions) and peer relations. Enculturation, socialization, group influences (significant and generalized others), and the impact of social sanctions as well as collective and behavioral attribution processes are covered.

CPSY 7733. Child and Adolescent Development.
(3-0) Credit 3 semester hours. This course will delve into the behavior and mental processes of children and adolescents. It will focus on the biological, social, emotional, cognitive, intellectual and interpersonal developmental paths from infancy to adolescence, along with a review of the current best practice social and clinical strategies (parent-child relations, family and systems psychology). Research findings pertinent to ethnic minority youth will be explored in an attempt to balance mainstream resources. Integration of theory and practice will be fundamental. Models of abnormal and normal trajectories will be explored within the context of individual and cultural differences.

CPSY 7743. Professional Ethics.
(3-0) Credit 3 semester hours. The current American Psychological Association (APA) Ethical Principles of Psychology and Code of Conduct are discussed in detail including the General Principles and the Components of the Ethical Standards: (1) Resolving Ethical Issues; (2) Competence: (3) Human Relations: (4) Privacy & Confidentiality: (5) Advertising & other Public Statements: (6) Record Keeping & Fees: (7) Education & Training: (8) Research & Publication; (9) Assessment: and (10) Therapy. Significant legal milestone and relevant cases (Tarasoff, Larry P. v. Riles, Youngberg v. Romeo, and Borwin v. Board of Education) are also discussed in detail.

CPSY 7793. Personality Psychology.
(3-0) Credit 3 semester hours. The major theorists and theoretical constructs and how these concepts evolved over time into the basic psychological schools of personality: behavioral/behaviorism (including operant, classical, learning, cognitive and rational/emotive approaches); psychoanalytic/psychodynamics; and the humanistic approach will be taught. Theories of personality with emphasis on development within childhood and adolescence will be explored. Coverage of psychological, social and cultural factors impacting the adjustment of both normal and abnormal individuals will be taught. Assessment tools include the MMPI-A, Myers-Briggs-Type Indicator, Draw-A-Person techniques and various Thematic Apperception measures.

CPSY 7803. Systems of Psychotherapy.
(3-0) Credit 3 semester hours. This course will include contemporary approaches in clinical psychology and a comprehensive treatment of the historical antecedents of selected theories and systems in psychology. It will also explore the theory, research and practice of major systems of psychotherapy including humanistic psychodynamic, behavioral cognitive, and family systems approach. The underlying assumptions about human nature and knowledge that form the foundation of these theories will also be examined with special consideration given to cultural issues throughout the course.

CPSY 7813. Assessment and Testing.
(3-0) Credit 3 semester hours. Test construction techniques, including reliability (test-retest, alternate forms, split-half, and coefficient alpha), validity (content, criterion-related, predictive, concurrent, incremental), significance (Type I alpha error, Type II beta error, alpha/degree of significance, power) Standardization (randomization, error, selective stratification) and Designs and Measures (Chi-square, t-test ANOVA, MANOVE; Pearson’s r, Spearman’s Rho, Coefficient of Determination, Regression, Standard Error of Measurement, Multiple Regression, Discriminate Functioning Analysis, Path Analysis, Analysis of Covariance) are examined in detail. Abilities tests include the Stanford-Binet, Wechsler scales, Kaufman, etc., as well as exposure to early childhood developmental measures (Bailey, Denver, McCarthy, and Slosson). Adjunctive scales include achievement-like assessments such as the Vineland and AAMD adaptive behavioral scales, Wide-Range Achievement Scale. Personality/clinical scales include the MMPI series, 167 Personality Factor test, CAT/TAT, Rorschach, Holtzman, Thematic Apperception Test, Children Apperception Tests, Sentence Completion Tests, Measures of Autobiographical Memories, Draw-A-Person and other drawing technique assessments for children and youth, among others.

CPSY 7823. Practicum I.
(3-0) Credit 3 semester hours. Provides supervised experience assisting psychologists in the assessment, management and treatment of patients. Students work in an applied institutional setting, such as a prison, court, special treatment clinic, hospital or rehabilitation setting. Training includes interviewing and taking case histories, observations, and staff and case conferences. Students will be required to spend 700 hours in a clinical setting under the supervision of a licensed psychologist.

CPYS 7833. Practicum II.
(3-0) Credit 3 semester hours. Provides supervised experience assisting psychologists in the assessment, management and treatment of patients. Students work in an applied institutional setting, such as a prison, court, special treatment clinic, hospital or rehabilitation setting. Training includes interviewing and taking case histories, observations, and staff and case conferences. Students will be required to spend 700 hours in a clinical setting under the supervision of a licensed psychologist.

CPSY 7843. Practicum III.
(3-0) Credit 3 semester hours. Provides supervised experience assisting psychologists in the assessment, management and treatment of patients. Students work in an applied institutional setting, such as a prison, court, special treatment clinic, hospital or rehabilitation setting. Training includes interviewing and taking case histories, observations, and staff and case conferences. Students will be required to spend 700 hours in a clinical setting under the supervision of a licensed psychologist.

CPSY 7853. Practicum IV.
(3-0) Credit 3 semester hours. Provides supervised experience assisting psychologists in the assessment, management and treatment of patients. Students work in an applied institutional setting, such as a prison, court, special treatment clinic, hospital or rehabilitation setting. Training includes interviewing and taking case histories, observations, staff and case conferences. Students will be required to spend 700 hours in a clinical setting under the supervision of a licensed psychologist.

CPSY 7863. Practicum V.
(3-0) Credit 3 semester hours. Provides supervised experience assisting psychologists in the assessment, management and treatment of patients. Students work in an applied institutional setting, such as a prison, court, special treatment clinic, hospital or rehabilitation setting. Training includes interviewing and taking case histories, observations, staff and case conferences. Students will be required to spend 700 hours in a clinical setting under the supervision of a licensed psychologist.

CPSY 7883. Psychopathology.
(3-0) Credit 3 semester hours. This course addresses the clinical relationship between assessments/evaluations and diagnosis as they are used to determine the appropriate best practice, intervention/treatment strategies. The standard for this type of clinical assessment/intervention process is rooted in the World Health Organization’s (WHO) International Classification of Diseases (ICD). From this emerged the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, better known as the DSM. Special attention is focused on those conditions evident in infancy, childhood and adolescence as well as to related genetic-based disorders with childhood and adolescent onset but are listed under adult syndromes; obsessive-compulsive disorder, anxiety disorders, depressive disorders and psychotic disorders. The clinical/legal significance of the DSM multi axial format is stressed as it pertains to childhood and adolescent forensic issues as is attention to the V-codes describing a multitude of relational problems that, if un-addressed, could lead to significant pathology later in life. A review of adjunctive assessment tools as they pertain to report writing will be used. The scope of knowledge relevant to medical, psychopharmacological and other assessments and interventions/treatments are explored as well.

CPSY 7933. History & Systems of Psychology
(3-0) Credit 3 semester hours. The development of psychology as a discipline in the late 19th century in both the United States and Europe is explored as well as the emergence of the different schools from the original school of behaviorism. Subsequent milestones include the origins of professional psychology with psychotherapeutic approaches: the parallel development of assessment tools (influenced by the French and the Binet-Simon IQ test); the rise of Humanistic Psychology; and the impact of both the German Gestaltans and the significance of the Chicago School in the creation of social psychology as well as the rich relationship in educational psychology as it emerged at Columbia, Clark and other universities. The origin of the American Psychological Association and the numerous divisions are also explored, as are the divisions within psychology and the breakaway American Psychological Society.

CPSY 7943. Advanced Research Methods I.
(3-0) Credit 3 semester hours. Development of research, design most useful to social sciences problems, descriptive systems for qualitative analysis; data collection methods such as observation, development of interview schedules, construction of questionnaires and sociometric devices; validity and reliability. Pre-requisite: JPSY 5943 or equivalent.

CPSY 7963. Advanced Statistical Techniques I.
(3-0) Credit 3 semester hours. Multivariate statistical techniques including multiple regression, logistic regression, discriminate analysis, multivariate analysis of variance, canonical correlation, factor analysis, cluster analysis, and multidimensional scaling. Pre-requisite: JPSY 5963 or equivalent.

CPSY 8913. Dissertation I.
(3-0) Credit 3 semester hours. Independent and original research leading to an acceptable doctoral dissertation. May be repeated. Prerequisite or co-requisite. Advancement to doctoral candidacy. This course is cross listed with JJUS 8913.

CPSY 8923. Dissertation II.
(3-0) Credit 3 semester hours. Independent and original research leading to an acceptable doctoral dissertation. May be repeated. Prerequisite or co-requisite. Advancement to doctoral candidacy and CPSY 8913. This course is cross listed with JJUS 8913.

CPSY 8933. Dissertation III.
(3-0) Credit 3 semester hours.
Independent and original research leading to an acceptable doctoral dissertation. May be repeated. Prerequisite or co-requisite. Advancement to doctoral candidacy and CPSY 8923. This course is cross listed with JJUS 8933.

CPSY 8943. Dissertation IV.
(3-0) Credit 3 semester hours
Independent and original research leading to an acceptable doctoral dissertation. May be repeated. Prerequisite or co-requisite. Advancement to doctoral candidacy and CPSY 8933. This course is cross listed with JJUS 8943.

CPSY 8946 Internship I.
Internship will be in a private or governmental organization under the direction of a faculty advisor.

CPSY 8986. Internship II.  
Internship will be in a private or governmental organization under the direction of a faculty advisor.

Juvenile Forensic Psychology Master’s Program

JPSY 5113. Psychology and the Juvenile Law.
Reviews the various areas, and ways, in which psychology interacts with the law and, in particular, the juvenile justice system. Explores topics such as psychological and psychiatric testimony, civil commitment, the rights of mental patients competency to stand trial, the insanity defense, the antisocial personality; trial child custody disputes and determinations, the psychology of the courtroom, and legal rules and regulations governing the practice of psychology. Considers the utility and the limitations of psychological expertise in relation to the legal system.

JPSY 5123. Psychology of Crime and Delinquency.
Focuses on the major psychological theories of criminal and aggressive behavior as they apply to juvenile delinquency. Viewpoints from cognitive, psychodynamic, psychoanalytic, behavioral, social learning, descriptive, and development psychologies are discussed and compared with current psychodiagnostic classification systems. Case examples are used to illustrate the various theories.  

JPSY 5223. Substance Abuse.
Provides a critical examination of various policy responses to the “Drug Program” in the United States based upon a review of selected empirical and theoretical studies. Includes an overview of drug usage by youth and adults and interrelationships between drug usage and juvenile crime

JPSY 5233. Violence and Aggression.
Critical evaluation and examination of violence and aggression, their origins and determinants, and their impact on the individual and society. Application to the field of forensic psychology will be emphasized through the liberal use of clinical and research material.

JPSY 5253. Domestic and Family Violence.
Addresses types of family violence by examining the extent of the problem, factors contributing to violence, and the consequences of family violence upon the individual, family, community, and society. Emphasis is placed on prevention techniques, non-violent conflict resolution strategies, and programs and services for training and intervention.

JPSY 5263. Psychology and Treatment of the Juvenile Offender.
Addresses the psychological factors leading to the causes, assessment, classification, and treatment of juvenile delinquency. Examines both psychodynamic and developmental approaches, emphasizing neurotic, constitutional and psycho pathological factors contributing to delinquency. Reviews the major psychological treatment approaches, with relevant case studies presented for illustrative detail.

Analyzes legal and institutional responses to juvenile crime from the perspective of learning theory and developmental psychology.

JPSY 5413. Behavior Modification and Learning Theory.
Examines various psychological learning theories. Addresses principles of behavior modification, operationalizing and assessing behavior, specific behavior therapy techniques, the design and empirical evaluation of behavior change programs, and the application of behavior therapy to treat clinical disorders in youth

JPSY 5423. Conflict Mediation/Resolution.
Examines the nature and uses of mediation as a conflict resolution method while taking into consideration the adversarial legal system. The course expands upon the variety of dispute resolution methods applicable to settings in families, neighborhoods, classrooms and juvenile justice agencies

JPSY 5433. Counseling.
An-in-depth evaluation of counseling as it is applied in the juvenile justice and juvenile correction settings. Emphasizes a psychosocial approach to the study of behavior with priority given to immediacy. Explores various treatment models, interviewing, interpersonal communication, and crisis intervention.

JPSY 5443. Group Dynamics and Group Treatment.
Facilitates the understanding of the dynamics of small groups and larger organizations, emphasizing groups formed for the purpose of psychotherapy and rehabilitation of offenders, as well as the group dynamics of institutions designed to work with delinquent populations. Topics include leadership, role specialization, group formation and development, composition and goals, group violence, group resistance to change, and those factors that facilitate positive growth within groups.

JPSY 5453. Childhood Psychopathology.
A focus on the psychological treatment and prevention of select examples of childhood psychopathology. Emphasis will be placed on those disorders that result in contact with the criminal justice system. Child disorders will be selected from among the following diagnostic categories; conduct disorders, attention deficit disorders, borderline, and schizophrenic disorders. Emphasis will be placed on children who grow up under unusually stressful conditions or experience forms of serious psychological trauma early in life.

JPSY 5523. Introduction to Neuropsychology.
Surveys the field of neuropsychology, including its relevant underpinnings, its place within traditional and forensic settings, and practical applications in the areas of assessment and rehabilitation of brain injury. This introduction examines brain-behavior correlates, psychological tests employed in the evaluation of nervous system trauma, and the common syndromes affiliated with such injury

JPSY 5533. Social Psychology and the Legal System.
Applies social psychological knowledge to the juvenile justice system. Places special focus on topics such as social psychology of justice institutions, environmental psychology, socialization into roles and identity, collective behavior, research on juries, attitude formation and change, and criminal identification.

JPSY 5763. Developmental Psychology.
Critical analysis of psychological development throughout the life span. Both cognitive and personality development will be considered from various theoretical perspectives as well as from empirical findings. Particular attention will be paid to the development of aggression in various states.

JPSY 5773. Psychology Seminar in Selected Topics.
Provides an opportunity for exploration of areas of forensic psychology not covered in other courses. The instructor chooses topics and will use projects and research articles.

JPSY 5783. Ethics.
The analytical and normative inquiry into the philosophical foundations of decisions. Emphasis is placed on understanding dilemmas faced by juvenile justice professionals.

JPSY 5843. Personality Assessment I.
Intelligence and Cognition. Provides practical experience in the evaluation of cognitive and intellectual functioning in children, adolescents, and adults. Focuses on the administration, scoring and interpretation of instruments such as the WAIS-R, the WISC-R, the WPPSI, and the Stanford Binet. Discusses general issues such as the nature of human intelligence and its measurement with explicit linkage to issues in forensic psychology. Required of externship option.

JPSY 5853. Personality Assessment II.
Objective Personality Assessment. Provides advanced experience in the administration and interpretation of objective personality tests such as the MMPI, MCMI, and CPI. Surveys the literature regarding the development and validity of objective measures of personality. Forensic applications of objective personality measures are discussed. Required of externship option.

JPSY 5863. Clinical Interviewing.
Centers on the clinical interview as a means of gathering relevant life data, defining problems, and resolving conflicts. Surveys the theory and use of the interview, particularly as related to various counseling theories.

JPSY 5943. Research Methods.
Includes defining and specifying research problems; developing and testing hypotheses; the logic of causal inference; learning to use the variety of research designs; sampling procedures; the collection, processing, and storing of research data, and the ethics of research. Required of thesis option for MSJFP students.

JPSY 5963. Applied Statistical Methods and Computing.
A study of descriptive and inferential statistics, measures of central tendency and variability, estimation, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, simple and multiple regressions and nonparametric methods. Students learn the use and value of each statistic while using SPSS as a problem-solving tool.

JPSY 5973. Field Work in Psychology.
Provides supervised experience assisting psychologists in the assessment, management, and treatment of patients. Students work in an applied institutional setting, such as a juvenile facility, special treatment clinic, hospital, or rehabilitation setting. Training includes interviewing, taking case histories, observations, and staff and case conferences. This field work course provides supervision and experience with emotionally disturbed pre-delinquent and delinquent children in institutional, school, and community settings. Develops skills in evaluation and treatment of such youths. Field work training is supplemented by conferences with a faculty advisor. Prerequisites: completion of a minimum of 24 graduate credits in the degree including JPSY 5843, 5853. Required of externship option.

JPSY 5983. Thesis.
Independent and original research leading to an acceptable master’s thesis. Required of thesis option.

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